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How do I take care of my lingual braces?

December 18th, 2019

Patients at Harte Orthodontics often wonder if lingual braces require the same amount of care as regular braces. The only real difference between lingual braces and traditional braces is the location of the brackets: lingual brackets are mounted on the back of your teeth. This mounting technique means that your braces completely hidden! However, you need to take special care of your lingual braces to prevent damage to the brackets and wires.

General care

Wearing lingual braces requires more caution when you eat hard or crunchy foods, which should be avoided whenever necessary. Applying excess pressure when you chew can cause brackets to break loose. This is more likely to happen if your upper front teeth overhang your lower teeth. You should also avoid foods that become caught in the brackets.

Brushing and flossing

Flossing can be done with a combination of regular dental floss and an inter-dental or wire brush. Floss threaders can also be used to get floss under the wires of your braces; ask our team for one at your next appointment with Dr. Douglas and Larry Harte. You should always brush and floss after every meal, because there is a greater chance of food particles becoming stuck in your braces. You can also use a mouthwash to reduce bacteria and fight plaque. As always, keep your regular dental hygiene appointments at our convenient Sparta or Livingston, NJ office to make sure that no problems develop while you’re undergoing orthodontic treatment.

Many individuals have a natural habit of rubbing their tongue along the inside of their teeth, especially when a change has occurred in their mouth. This can cause soreness or small abrasions on your tongue. While they should subside within a few weeks, the use of dental wax can be helpful.

Please ask Dr. Douglas and Larry Harte and our team any questions you may have about your new braces and how to care for them and your teeth. The better care you take of your teeth and braces now, the better your outcome will be when your orthodontic work is complete!

Are you ready for orthodontic treatment?

December 11th, 2019

If you’ve been hiding your smile because you have crooked teeth or gaps between your teeth, it’s time to consider orthodontic treatment with Dr. Douglas and Larry Harte. Preparing for treatment is an important part of getting the smile you want.

Basic exams

The first step of preparation is the examination. An oral exam and X-rays taken at our office are necessary to identify potential problems and ensure the right steps are taken to prepare for orthodontic treatment at Harte Orthodontics.

Dr. Douglas and Larry Harte will first examine your teeth and take X-rays to determine if it is necessary to extract any teeth or additional work is necessary before braces are possible. You will be prepared for the next step of treatment after your exam is complete and potential problems are identified.

Model for bite

The next step in preparing for orthodontic is taking a plaster model of the mouth. With the model, Dr. Douglas and Larry Harte will be able to determine how the jaw is aligned so that appropriate adjustments can be made to the mouth and jaw with braces.

Depending on the situation, the model may be used to help evaluate your jaw and make decisions about appropriate treatment for your specific needs. Dr. Douglas and Larry Harte can create a model of your mouth with the bite indentation that is taken during preparation.

Extracting teeth

If it is determined that a tooth extraction is necessary, then the final step of preparing for orthodontic treatment is the removal of teeth. Only Dr. Douglas and Larry Harte can determine if it is necessary to remove any teeth before moving forward with the procedure to put on braces.

When your teeth are crooked, have a gap, or otherwise make you unhappy, orthodontic treatment at Harte Orthodontics may be an appropriate solution. Although it may take time to prepare for the actual procedure, making the decision to seek treatment can provide the opportunity to show the world a beautiful smile.

For more information about orthodontic treatment and its benefits, or to schedule a consultation with Dr. Douglas and Larry Harte, please give us a call at our convenient Sparta or Livingston, NJ office!

How do teeth move with braces?

December 4th, 2019

Although teeth seem to be solidly fixed in their sockets (at least they don’t wobble when we chew!), all teeth can easily be moved if Dr. Douglas and Larry Harte and our staff attach brackets and wires to them called braces. In the past, all braces were made of stainless steel, but today’s advanced dental technology gives people the option of wearing transparent, acrylic mouth trays called Invisalign®, or relying on traditional metal braces for correcting malocclusions.

Brackets, Slots, and Arch Wires – Oh My!

When light pressure is consistently exerted on teeth, they will gradually move in the direction of the force. For example, affixing brackets to front teeth and threading a flexible, metal wire through tiny slots on the front of the brackets allows the orthodontist to tighten this arch wire enough to initiate desired movement of teeth. Generally, orthodontic patients visit Harte Orthodontics once a month to have this wire tightened to keep teeth moving in the desired direction.

Tissues surrounding the teeth that experience pressure from arch wires will slowly (and, for the most part, painlessly) stretch, and allow the socket to enlarge so the tooth and its root become looser temporarily. This allows the root to move without causing bleeding or pain. Once Dr. Douglas and Larry Harte and our staff are satisfied with the repositioning of teeth, we will remove the braces and let bone material fill in the socket so that teeth are solidified into their new (and straighter) positions.

Clear Braces vs. Traditional Braces

Both types of orthodontic corrective devices move teeth in the same manner: by applying a continual force against teeth. Clear aligners, like Invisalign, are mouth trays made of hard acrylic material that people wear for at least 23 hours a day. Unlike metal braces, Invisalign can be removed for eating and brushing purposes and the aligners are nearly invisible because of their transparency.

Invisalign aligners are usually reserved for people with gaps between their teeth or whose teeth are only slightly crooked. Traditional metal braces are often necessary when severe malocclusion exists and requires more pressure than Invisalign offers.

Thanksgiving Trivia

November 27th, 2019

At Harte Orthodontics we love learning trivia and interesting facts about Thanksgiving! This year, Dr. Douglas and Larry Harte wanted to share some trivia that might help you feel a bit smarter at the holiday dinner table and help create some great conversation with friends and family.

The Turkey

There is no historical evidence that turkey was eaten at the first Thanksgiving dinner. It was a three-day party shared by the Wamponoag Indians and the pilgrims in 1621. Historians say they likely ate venison and seafood.

According to National Geographic, the dinner at the Plymouth colony was in October and included about 50 English colonists and 90 American Indian men. The first Thanksgiving dinner could have included corn, geese, and pumpkin.

Today, turkey is the meat of choice. According to the National Turkey Association, about 690 million pounds of turkey are consumed during Thanksgiving, or about 46 million turkeys.

The Side Dishes

The green bean casserole became popular about 50 years ago. Created by the Campbell Soup Company, it remains a popular side dish. According to Campbell’s, it was developed when the company was creating an annual holiday cookbook. The company now sells about $20 million worth of cream of mushroom soup each year, which is a major part of the recipe.

While there were likely plenty of cranberries for the pilgrims and Indians to enjoy, sugar was a luxury. What we know today as cranberry sauce was not around in those early Thanksgiving days. About 750 million pounds of cranberries are produced each year in the US, with about 30 percent consumed on Thanksgiving.

The Parade

Since Thanksgiving did not become a national holiday until Lincoln declared it in 1863, the annual parades were not yearly events until much later. The biggest parade that continues to draw crowds is the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. Beginning in 1924 with about 400 employees, they marched from Convent Avenue to 145th Street in New York City. Famous for the huge hot-air balloons today, it was actually live animals borrowed from the Central Park Zoo that were the stars of the show then.

However you choose to spend your Thanksgiving holiday, we wish you a safe, happy and healthy holiday with those you love.

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